AGoTI almost wrote this entry several weeks ago, but life happened…you know how it goes. But what I wanted to address was Game of Thrones and more specifically, the Unbowed, unbent, and unbroken episode. Most already know, that this was the episode where Sansa Stark marries and is later raped by Ramsey Bolton. Now, it shouldn’t have to be said, but for the sake of argument I will say it here: rape is never a good thing. Luckily for us, Game of Throne is a fictitious show and not real. Kind of sad, but I shouldn’t have to point that out either, and yet here I am doing exactly that. And yet, after the episode aired many took to social media claiming that they were never watching the show again and how Sansa‘s rape in no way added to the plot of the character nor the storyline. As for me, I love the show and will continue to watch as I saw nothing wrong with the episode in question or any other episodes. You see, people often forget that television is not only about entertainment, it is also about exploring and bringing to light aspects of our society that we feel need to be addressed, talked about, explored and in general, torn apart in order to gain a better understanding of it. I’m not saying that is what happened here, but rape has been a buzz word in the media lately – especially in the last election – so it is not out of the realm of possibility that this is what was going on. Secondly, we don’t know that this horrible act didn’t add anything to the character, that will be determined later on down the line as the show continues and the character grows. And lastly, the books, in George R. R. Martins own words, “[R]eflect a patriarchal society based on the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages were not a time of sexual egalitarianism. It was very classist, dividing people into three classes. And they had strong ideas about the roles of women.” In his books Martin has made several of the main characters women, giving them a tremendous amount of influence power in the goings-on of the story. That’s saying a lot since many women in history had tremendous sway and power in their day – the Mistress Diane De Poitiers of Henry II, comes to mind – but many of them only had that power behind the scenes and through a man, they rarely had the opportunity to get up and speak their mind. So in that sense, while Martin, I believe, is trying to mesh together a little history in his fiction, the role of women in his books aren’t historically accurate. They have power, they’re outspoken, and they openly challenge the men that get in their way. Lastly, for the second time, there is plenty of violence against men in this show as well. Jamie gets his hand cut off; Joffrey is poisonedmany other men were burned to death at the hands of Stannis, and yet I have said nothing about that. Why? Because it’s fiction. Now if the producers of the show had created a scene where Sansa was raped and they tried to make the scene lighthearted or comical, I might have had a problem with that, but everything in that one scene shouted this is bad, even the music was somber.

As for me, I have continued to watch the show and love it as much today as I did when I started watching it. And, I plan on buying this latest season on blu-ray when it comes out.

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